To an Unknown God

The summer holiday season is on us and many Focus readers will be looking forward to time away from their day jobs. One of the things I enjoy about a holiday is the opportunity to travel and visit new places, especially when this is overseas. It is good to experience different cultures and explore historical sites.

A couple of years back I enjoyed a holiday in Cyprus. One afternoon we visited the ruins of the ‘Tombs of the Kings’ near Paphos. As we walked on ancient roadways and explored the various burial chambers it was humbling to think that the first people to visit these sites did so 2,400 years ago. As we walked around I found myself wondering whether St Paul too may have visited this site. It is recorded in Acts that Paul and his companions arrived by sea at Salamis on the eastern side of Cyprus and proceeded to Paphos where they embarked on another ship headed for Perga (near Antalya in modern day Turkey) during the first of his missionary journeys. In all Paul made 3 such trips and travelled through much of modern day Turkey and Greece before finally being taken to Rome under arrest. Some scholars believe he may also have travelled as far as Spain. These journeys were about as far removed as you can imagine from modern day holiday trips. Even with excellent Roman roads, overland travel was dangerous and arduous and it would take several days to cover distances that would take only a few hours by car. Sea travel too was hazardous and highly weather dependant. It is recorded that Paul was shipwrecked on three occasions, once spending 24 hours adrift in the open sea! Far from being a tourist, Paul was a seasoned and hardy traveller.

During one of his missionary journeys Paul found himself at a loose end in Athens where he was waiting for his travelling companions to join him. So he decided to wander round the city and do a spot of sightseeing. What he saw troubled him because he found that the city was full of idols. Never one to miss an opportunity he began to reason with Jews in the synagogue, and with those who would listen in the market place, explaining to them the good news about Jesus and the resurrection. You can read Paul’s message in Acts 17 but what strikes me as most interesting is that he praises the Athenians for their spirituality. One altar in particular had caught his attention; one with the inscription: TO AN UNKNOWN GOD. Paul then went on to show them that, rather than having to continue worshipping in ignorance, through Jesus they could know God and worship him in truth.

Many people today have vague notions of spirituality; a feeling that there is some kind of spiritual force operating behind the scenes. They may not have an altar inscribed like the one in Athens, but nevertheless they consider God to be unknowable. The wonderful news that Paul gave the Athenians is just as relevant today. God is not an ethereal, unknowable spirit. On the contrary, Jesus came to make God known to us. If you are willing to put your trust in Jesus you too can get to know the eternal, living God.

This blog post featured in the July/August 2015 edition of Hook Focus

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